Kitchen Shelf Styling Tips + Tricks


Studio Kitchen | Photo by Public 311 Design


Open shelving has been gaining popularity in kitchens in recent years but styling them can be tricky. How do you keep things looking cohesive and curated rather than jumbled and messy? Here are some of my favorite tricks for getting that Insta-worthy look while keeping it functional and practical, too.

Studio Kitchen | Photo by Public 311 Design


Keep everyday items close at hand. Unless you have endless storage, your kitchen shelves won't be purely decorative but will need to hold some everyday items. Start filling your shelves with any plates, bowls, or glassware you want to display, making sure it's easy to access. I like to stack similar items together, but not crowd the shelves too much. You may also want to pull out some larger serving pieces, and as a bonus, you'll probably find yourself using them more often than when they were tucked away in a cabinet. I often hear concerns about dust when we specify open shelving, but honestly, when things are getting used and rotating in and out of the dishwasher frequently, dust really isn't an issue.

Oak Hills Kitchen | Photo by Amy Bartlam


Add vertical layers. Once your daily-use items are placed, you can start filling in space and bringing height with books or serving pedestals. This is a great way to elevate a stack of low bowls or draw attention to an especially pretty item. As you place larger pieces, move in a zig-zig pattern to keep the shelves looking balanced. I also like to stand wooden cutting boards or small pieces of art behind things (especially clear glassware) or along the counters below the shelves for added color, texture, and height.

Studio Kitchen | Photo by Public 311 Design


Vary texture and shape. If you have all-white dishes, adding a few handmade ceramic, wooden, or woven pieces will bring a little life to your shelves. And likewise, if everything is stacked and horizontal, look for a tall vase or pitcher to break it up. I'm always on the lookout for things that are functional but don't sacrifice on style, so we've added some great pieces to our studio. If you need some help rounding out your collections, you can get in touch with us by emailing sales@lindseybrookedesign.com.

Featherwood Kitchen | Photo by Amy Bartlam


Bring in something living. Even a really pretty vignette can fall a little flat to me unless it includes some sort of living thing. Small potted herbs or bowls of produce are obvious choices in a kitchen -- and they are useful! I also like potted plants (real or faux) and the grocery store floral section can be a great source for greenery like eucalyptus or olive branches, which are a pretty dusty green color and will last a long time in a vase of water.

Studio Kitchen | Photo by Public 311 Design


Edit. I like to err on the side of adding too much, and editing it down later on. Sometimes it takes a few tries to get it feeling exactly right and it will be easier to start with more then you think you need and take away, then to do it the other way around. If you feel like you are in over your head, we're launching an in-home styling service using products from our studio very soon, so get in touch if you are interested.


And of course, if you are looking for full-service design services, please fill out our design inquiry.

FAQ'S        DESIGN CAMP     COURSES     CAREERS        CONTACT

Be the first to know about project reveals, design tips,

special events and MORE!

journey

© 2021 LINDSEY BROOKE DESIGN.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  SITE BY CHAMBERS DESIGN STUDIO
  • YouTube